The Latest

Determine plant nutrients status through Nutrients Deficiency Symptoms

On November 19, 2013, in Soil Science, by admin
0

Introduction Visual plant nutrients deficiency symptoms can be a very powerful diagnostic tool for evaluating the nutrient status of plants. One should keep in mind, however, that a given individual visual symptom is seldom sufficient to make a definitive diagnosis of a plant’s nutrient status. Many of the classic deficiency symptoms such as tip burn, […]

Introduction

Visual plant nutrients deficiency symptoms can be a very powerful diagnostic tool for evaluating the nutrient status of plants. One should keep in mind, however, that a given individual visual symptom is seldom sufficient to make a definitive diagnosis of a plant’s nutrient status.

Many of the classic deficiency symptoms such as tip burn, chlorosis and necrosis are characteristically associated with more than one mineral deficiency and also with other stresses that by themselves are not diagnostic for any specific nutrient stress. However, their detection is extremely useful in making an evaluation of nutrient status.

In addition to the actual observations of morphological and spectral symptoms, knowing the location and timing of these symptoms is a critical aspect of any nutrient status evaluation. Plants do not grow in isolation, they are part of the overall environment and as such they respond to environmental changes as that affect nutrient availability.

Also, plants do influence their environment and can contribute to environmental changes, which in turn can affect the nutrient status of the plant.

Nutrient demand and Use-efficiency

Although, all plants of the same species respond similarly to nutrient stress, plants of similar species will often show significant differences in their nutrient use efficiency.This results from differences in growth rate, root distribution, phase of development, and efficiency of nutrient uptake and utilization.

This implies that in any given location, plants from one species may become nutrient-deficient, while those from another species growing in the same environment right next to them, may not show any deficiency symptoms.

Growth rate also affects nutrient status. When the nutrient supply is barely inadequate for growth under existing environmental conditions, many plants adjust their growth rate to match that supported by the available nutrient supply without displaying typical visual deficiency symptoms.

Agricultural systems differ from natural systems in that crop plants have been selected primarily for rapid growth under low stress conditions. This rapid growth rate results in a high nutrient demand by these plants and a higher incidence of nutrient deficiency unless supplemental fertilizers are supplied.

In agriculture systems, chronic deficiency symptoms develop mostly in crops with little or limited fertilization. Acute nutrient deficiency symptoms most often occur when new crops with a higher nutrient demand are introduced or less productive lands are brought under cultivation for the production of rapidly growing crop plants.